Part of the Skiing States Series involves visiting the land of saunas and skiing. The upper half of the Midwest boasts beautiful snowy forests, blocky mountains, lake shore and eroded plains landscapes. Some areas are graced with lake effect snow that dumps more than 300″ of the white stuff per year. Nordic skiing has been in the Midwest since the Scandinavians first arrived there in the mid 1800s. They say the first skiing in the United States started in Wisconsin. On the Western side of this region buffalo still roam free in Theodore Roosevelt National Park next to steep gulleys and river cuts while impressive granite needles poke above the South Dakota Black Hills forests.

Ski touring on Lake Superior, Minnesota

The Upper Peninsula of Michigan has some of the best snow and wilderness in the area. Michigan native and backcountry skier Kyle Bolen sums up his description with:

“You’ll find an ingrained ski culture or ski/surf culture here. The U.P. has a lot of super quirky folks that are an absolute riot. The USA ski and snowboard hall of fame is in the U.P. as well, along with an olympic training center. Skiing is a large part of life for a lot of people there.”

Given my farm-field-skiing beginnings and enjoyment of nordic skiing since age 4, I thought it was vitally important to include our upper Midwestern Highpoints in the Skiing States Series. I’d be searching for the steep powder here, which does exist, and gliding for miles across wild lands. The Minnesota episode of Skiing States will be one of our first Midwestern episodes, stay tuned for discovering some cool places that you never knew existed.

(Photo above: awesome skiing along Lake Superior in Minnesota) (Photo below: lake effect snows slamming into the U.P. and Mitten of Michigan)


Midwestern highpoints include:

Mt. Arvon – Michigan. 1978′
Timms Hill – Wisconsin. 1951′
Hawkeye Point – Iowa. 1670′
White Butte – North Dakota. 3507′
Black Elk Peak (Harney Pk) – South Dakota. 7244′
Panorama Point – Nebraska. 5429′

 


Midwestern Articles Currently Available:


Other Regions of the Project:


 

Get streams of photos of skiing highpoints from the Treasured Heights Facebook Page or on Instagram feed. Or subscribe to the YouTube Channel.